InterAgency Papers (IAP)


IAP 16W (June 2015) Losing Lessons at the Water’s Edge



IAP 16W (June 2015) Losing Lessons at the Water’s Edge
by Benjamin Cabana Interagency coordination for complex contingency operations is an extremely difficult challenge. Bringing together the various tools of American power in a holistic manner is widely recognized as a serious roadblock to successful stabilization and reconstruction operations. Defense, development, and diplomacy are all required for a successful stability… Read More

IAP 15W (January 2015) Embracing the Interagency Implications of a Changing National Security Strategy



IAP 15W (January 2015) Embracing the Interagency Implications of a Changing National Security Strategy

This paper examines the criticality of Army-interagency collaboration and assess the Army’s readiness to effectively engage and leverage the interagency. It discusses existing guidance and illustrate the need for a more clearly-articulated Army interagency strategy.

IAP 14W (November 2014) Strategic Approach to Combat Transnational Organized Crime



IAP 14W (November 2014) Strategic Approach to Combat Transnational Organized Crime

This paper looks at the disjointed efforts, a lack of understanding, and limited motivation to participate that characterize the current state of affairs on combating transnational organized crime, and examines approaches to better address this issue. The authors discuss whole-of-government and partner-nation efforts to combat transnational organized crime.

IAP 11W (November 2013) Evolving a Hamstrung and Broken System



IAP 11W (November 2013) Evolving a Hamstrung and Broken System

The author of this paper argues there is a need for an evolution in interagency training and education to efficiently and effectively enable collaborative teams to achieve strategic objectives in complex humanitarian assistance/disaster response (HA/DR) operations overseas...

IAP 10W (September 2012) Domestic Security Cooperation: A Unified Approach to Homeland Security and Defense



IAP 10W (September 2012) Domestic Security Cooperation: A Unified Approach to Homeland Security and Defense

Using a capabilities-based assessment model as a guide, this paper examines the current operational capabilities of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Protection, and NORTHCOM. The analysis highlights the capabilities required to combat current and future threats along the southwest border and identifies the gaps between existing and required capabilities.

IAP 9W (May 2012) Rethinking the Interagency Role in Preventing Conflict in Dealing with Failing or Failed States



IAP 9W (May 2012) Rethinking the Interagency Role in Preventing Conflict in Dealing with Failing or Failed States

Contingency operations are currently taking place in dangerous, unpredictable, and highly volatile environments where local government institutions have weakened or collapsed. In view of these conflict situations, it is recognized that the initial task of the military (whether national or multilateral) is to provide security.

IAP 8W (May 2012) Embassy in the Lead: Lessons on Interagency Unity of Effort for Today’s U.S. Mission to Iraq from the 1947–1949 U.S. Mission to Greece



IAP 8W (May 2012) Embassy in the Lead: Lessons on Interagency Unity of Effort for Today’s U.S. Mission to Iraq from the 1947–1949 U.S. Mission to Greece

On December 15, 2011, the U.S. mission in Iraq became State Department-led, and all U.S. military activities became the responsibility of the U.S. Embassy’s Office of Security Cooperation–Iraq (OSC-I). There are few, if any, well-known examples of such a transition in U.S. history that might inform civilian and military leaders in Baghdad.

IAP 7W (May 2012) The Genie in the Bottle: Opportunist and Antagonistic Responses to Whole of Government Approaches



IAP 7W (May 2012) The Genie in the Bottle: Opportunist and Antagonistic Responses to Whole of Government Approaches

When intervening forces create a safe and secure environment to implement a whole of government approach, they simultaneously create opportunities for hitherto unnoticed and powerless opponents to do the same—and sometimes more successfully.