failed states


Agency partnerships vital to defeat ISIS



Agency partnerships vital to defeat ISIS
Earlier this week, Mark Swayne spoke before the House Armed Services subcommittee on the Department of Defense’s (DoD) role in defeating the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Swayne is the acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for stability and humanitarian affairs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary… Read More

Featured Article: Rethinking Civil Affairs



Featured Article: Rethinking Civil Affairs
Featured article: Interagency Qualifications to Address Fragility, or Rethinking Civil Affairs by Kurt E. Müller The defense sector has a long-standing appreciation of the value of whole-of-government approaches to national security challenges. The phrase “all elements of national power” resonates with Department of Defense (DoD) leadership and is a common… Read More

IAE 15-01W A New Strategic Framework: Development as an Instrument of American Power



IAE 15-01W A New Strategic Framework: Development as an Instrument of American Power

This essay explores the four traditional instruments of national power – diplomatic, economic, informational, and military, or DIME – and proposes that development be included as an instrument of national power...

IAP 9W (May 2012) Rethinking the Interagency Role in Preventing Conflict in Dealing with Failing or Failed States



IAP 9W (May 2012) Rethinking the Interagency Role in Preventing Conflict in Dealing with Failing or Failed States

Contingency operations are currently taking place in dangerous, unpredictable, and highly volatile environments where local government institutions have weakened or collapsed. In view of these conflict situations, it is recognized that the initial task of the military (whether national or multilateral) is to provide security.

IAP 4 (April 2011) Inception, Challenges, and Impact on S/CRS



IAP 4 (April 2011) Inception, Challenges, and Impact on S/CRS

by Major Jay Liddick and Dr. David A. Anderson

Like the post-9/11 Bush administration, the Obama administration must confront numerous security threats to U.S. national interests at home and abroad. The Obama administration, however, has the added challenge of a severe domestic economic recession. Amidst the economic quandary, President Obama and Congress must prudently go about the arduous task of determining how to best utilize U.S. resources to mitigate national security threats in a domestic environment demanding fiscal discipline.