Publications

The Simons Center Publications

The Simons Center is committed to the development of military leaders with interagency operational skills and an interagency body of knowledge that facilitates broader and more effective cooperation and policy implementation within the United States government. As part of this mission, the Simons Center produces a number of publications that cover a broad range of interagency topics including national security; leader development; ethics; counterterrorism; stabilization and reconstruction operations; homeland defense and security; and disaster preparation and response. The Simons Center’s main publications include the:

The InterAgency Journal (IAJ) is a peer-reviewed, national security studies journal, published semiannually. Journal articles are approximately 3,000 to 5,000 words in length.
The InterAgency Essay (IAE) series consists of individually published essays of 1,000 and 3,000 words in length that are not peer-reviewed.
The InterAgency Paper (IAP) series includes in-depth studies, individually published, of approximately 5,000 to 10,000 words in length. IAP submissions are peer-reviewed.
The InterAgency Studies (IAS) series consist if sponsored projects of the Simons Center on a particular issue and may include multiple articles or essays.

Other publications include special reports, web-exclusive publications and books. See the Simons Center Publication Descriptions for further information on each of our publication types.

Individuals wishing to receive hard copies of Simons Center’s InterAgency Journal should contact editor@thesimonscenter.org. To receive updates about the release of new Simons Center publications, Simons Center news and events, and other interagency news and events via email, please sign up for email alerts – an email alert sign up is available on most every page of the Simons Center website.

The Simons Center is always looking for authors to contribute manuscripts reflecting their experience, study, and insight. Please go to our Contribute Content page for complete submission instructions.

Disclaimer: The works published by the Simons Center represent the opinions of the authors and do not reflect the official views of any United States government agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Army, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, the Command and General Staff College Foundation, the Simons Center, or any other non-government, private, public, or international organization.


This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

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This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

... Read More

This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

... Read More

This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

... Read More

This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

... Read More

This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

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Violent extremist organizations have increased their online presence using the Internet to establish an online brand, communicate with members, and radicalize sympathizers. The regular use of online media, forums, and communications has altered the way that governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and private companies must approach countering violent extremism online.

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This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

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Interagency coordination for complex contingency operations is an extremely difficult challenge. Bringing together the various tools of American power in a holistic manner is widely recognized as a serious roadblock to successful stabilization and reconstruction operations. Defense, development, and diplomacy are all required for a successful stability operation; however, the U.S. government has largely failed to incorporate all these tools in operational settings.

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This content is exclusive to Simons Center Fellows. Don’t have an account? Become a Simons Center Fellow to access all available publications. Visit the “My Account” page to login or reset your password.

... Read More

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