Publications

The Simons Center Publications

The Simons Center is committed to the development of military leaders with interagency operational skills and an interagency body of knowledge that facilitates broader and more effective cooperation and policy implementation within the United States government. As part of this mission, the Simons Center produces a number of publications that cover a broad range of interagency topics including national security; leader development; ethics; counterterrorism; stabilization and reconstruction operations; homeland defense and security; and disaster preparation and response. The Simons Center’s main publications include the:

InterAgency Journal (IAJ)
InterAgency Essays (IAE)
InterAgency Papers (IAP)
InterAgency Studies (IAS)

Other publications include special reports, web-exclusive publications and books.

Individuals wishing to receive hard copies of Simons Center’s InterAgency Journal should contact editor@thesimonscenter.org. To receive updates about the release of new Simons Center publications, Simons Center news and events, and other interagency news and events via email, please sign up for email alerts – an email alert sign up is available on most every page of the Simons Center website.

The Simons Center is always looking for authors to contribute manuscripts reflecting their experience, study, and insight. Please go to our Contribute Content page for complete submission instructions.

Disclaimer: The works published by the Simons Center represent the opinions of the authors and do not reflect the official views of any United States government agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Army, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, the Command and General Staff College Foundation, the Simons Center, or any other non-government, private, public, or international organization.


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In early 2011, senior leaders from across the U.S. interagency community participated in a discussion on how to overcome the “messy” transitions in which they so often struggled.  This handbook is the result of those exchanges…

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by Robert M. Beecroft

Ambassador Beecroft reviews the State Department’s 2010 Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) and a 2011 report by the American Academy of Diplomacy and the Stimson Center, both reports stress the importance of professional education and training for the United States Foreign Service, and state that professional education and training are essential to the overall performance of the U.S. Foreign Service if it is to lead an increasingly multi-agency foreign policy apparatus…

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by David T. Culkin

In an era of persistent threats to the homeland and constricted decision cycles, American policy makers must embrace information sharing if they are to protect the citizens and infrastructure of the United States. The key to advancing homeland security lies in managing information so efficiently and effectively that U.S. policy leaders rapidly acquire the understanding they need to make decisions…

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by Frederick M. Kaiser

Interagency coordinative arrangements and activities—called for in public laws, executive orders, and administrative directives—appear to be growing in number, prominence, and proposals throughout virtually all individual policy areas and across-the-board. Underlying this growth are several developments…

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by Christopher Lamb and Edward Marks

In this essay we argue that the interagency integration problem can be rectified by expanding the President’s power to delegate a modified “chief of mission” authority similar to that granted ambassadors to oversee and direct the activities of employees from diverse government organizations working in a foreign country…

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by Rick Swain

This paper argues that USAID and military problem-solving approaches are converging, and broadly understood techniques of design offer the best synthesis for achieving unity of effort in whole-of-government operations.

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by Major Jay Liddick and Dr. David A. Anderson

Like the post-9/11 Bush administration, the Obama administration must confront numerous security threats to U.S. national interests at home and abroad. The Obama administration, however, has the added challenge of a severe domestic economic recession. Amidst the economic quandary, President Obama and Congress must prudently go about the arduous task of determining how to best utilize U.S. resources to mitigate national security threats in a domestic environment demanding fiscal discipline.

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Inside this issue:  What “right” looks like in the Interagency: A Commander’s Perspective, by Gen. William “Kip” Ward; Interagency Cooperation: An Ambassador’s Perspective, by Thomas J. Miller…and much more.

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